STEM in Space

Fayette Academy is proud to announce that we have been chosen to participate in the 2014 Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP).  SSEP is the first pre-college STEM education program that is both a U.S. national initiative and implemented as an on-orbit commercial space venture. (ISS expedition 30, NASA photo)

 

 

 

 

Montague Family Attends 2015 SSEP Conference

Dragon Returns Experiment to Earth

SpaceX-5 Dragon Ferry Vehicle will Return to Earth Today

SSEP Mission 6 to ISS: Experiment Log

Mission 6 Yankee Clipper Experiments

SpaceX Launch Aborted

NASA: Ready to Launch Experiments to Space Station

Science Payloads Headed to ISS

SpaceX

Help send students to Kennedy Space Center in December for the rocket re-launch. The students’ project will be delivered to the International Space Station and conducted by the astronauts, including Tennessee native, Barry “Butch” Wilmore.  Click to donate

Re-Flight of SSEP Mission 6 Projects

What We Do in the Face of Failure When the First Rocket Explodes

Energy Production and Flight – Storyboard

December Re-Launch Dates

WREG Channel 3 News: Story Unmanned Antares Rocket Explodes

WREG Channel 3 News Story: Rocket Carrying FA Experiment Explodes

Channel 24 News Story: Local Space-Bound Project Goes Up In Flames

Tucker Whittington, Mark Montague, and Averie Davis are preparing their FME tube to send to Houston.

Fayette Academy Live Launch News

Wallops Island – Mid Atlantic Regional Space Port Link

SSEP Mission 6 to the International Space Station (ISS)

Live NASA Conference Video from Fayette Academy

Student Scientists Present Unexpected Results from Space Station Research (NASA)

Research Results Reported by Student Teams at 2014 SSEP National Conference

Click to Help the Fayette Academy Research Team Launch their Experiment

Fayette County STEM Project Headed to International Space Station

Three Local Student Teams Selected for National Review Panel Competition

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Winners

Selected Experiments for Mission 6 to ISS

Message from Dr. Goldstein

Night Sky Watch Announcement 4-22-14

BACKGROUND RESEARCH AND NOTE TAKING

SSEP Flight Experiment Proposal Guide

Required Specifity for Description of Experimental Samples

SSEP Grading Rubric

SSEP Journal Newsletter 5-5-14

SSEP Journal Newsletter 4-28-14

STEM Journal Newsletter 4-22-14

SSEP Journal Newsletter 4-14-14

SSEP Journal Newsletter 4-7-14

SSEP Journal Newsletter 4-1-14 

SSEP Journal Newsletter 3-24-14

SSEP Journal Newsletter 3-17-14

Student Week 2 Review

SSEP Patch Design Competition

Student Experiment to Fly on International Space Station

 We Invite Your Community to Look Up and See ISS Fly Overhead

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Video

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Community Network Hubsite

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program in the News

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Selected for Flight

Scientific Return and Reporting

21st Century Science Education Thrives Aboard the Space Station

NASA Video Showcasing the Power of the Program

Students meet with St. Jude researcher Dr. Racquel Collins-Underwood as they begin their experimental design for ISS in space.

 

  • The Student Space Flight Experiments Program [or SSEP] is undertaken by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE; http://ncesse.org), a project of the 501(c)(3) Tides Center, in  partnership with NanoRacks, LLC (http://www.nanoracksllc.com).
  • This on-orbit educational research opportunity is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory.

In the News

Local Student Project Going to the International Space Station

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program’s (SSEP) Winning Research Team using a spectrophotometer collecting Absorbance and Transmittance data.  Left to right, Tucker Whittington, 9th grade, Averi Davis, 10th grade, Mark Montague 9th grade, Harley Wade, 9th grade (Biology Honors Students)

The Step 2 Review Panel for the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program has selected the experiment Reishi Mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum) VS. E. coli and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia as the Somerville, TN, flight experiment for SSEP Mission 6 to the International Space Station.  The members of the student research team pictured above working on the spectrophotometer are Principal Investigator: Mark Montague, Co-Investigators: Tucker Whittington, Averi Davis, and Harley Wade. These ninth and tenth grade students at Fayette Academy submitted a research project exactly how professional researchers formally compete. Fayette Academy conducted a local Flight Experiment Design Competition, engaging more than three hundred students in teams of 3-5, with each team proposing a microgravity research project that can be carried out in the mini-laboratory and vying for the community’s single experiment slot. The competition was conducted through formal submission of real (but grade level appropriate) research proposals by the student teams.

Jeff Goldstein, SSEP Creator and Director, stated in an email to SSEP Program Co-Director and Biology Lab Instructor, Donna Burrus, “SSEP is not a simulation. It is a very real student immersion in space science research, and a remarkable opportunity for Fayette County. SSEP provides each community that participates its own – very real – Space Program”.

Each community’s flight experiment was selected through a formal 2-step proposal review process. The final selection was carried out by the SSEP National Step 2 Review Board, which met at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum. The flight experiment selected has now entered a 4-month NASA flight safety review at Johnson Space Center. These steps include laboratory refinement by the student flight team, handover to NanoRacks in Houston for integration into the experiments payload, and payload integration into the ferry vehicle for flight, Mission 6, to the International Space Station (ISS). SSEP experiment payloads launch from either Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft, or from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS), Wallops Island, Virginia, on an Orbital Sciences Cygnus spacecraft.

In order to meet Johnson Space Center’s NASA Toxicology Flight Safety Review requirements the team submitted a detailed formal experimental overview to NCESSE for forwarding to NanoRacks, LLC, the SSEP flight services provider. This week the research team received NanoRacks level one approval. Their experimental details included astronaut interactions, experimental design, and detailed material lists including Material Data Safety Sheets. The team’s formal experimental details will now proceed to NASA for flight safety approval.

Burrus said, “This is such an exciting opportunity not only for this team but for all students in Fayette County.  All students will be able to follow this amazing journey online at SSEP.ncesse.org under Mission 6.  Our student team has now transitioned into the United States space program operations. We are excited about the journey and cannot wait to watch the rocket launch with our teams’ experiment onboard. We are so thankful to the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE), Tennessee Space Grant Consortium at Vanderbilt University, Fayette County Education Association, Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Dr. Racquel Collins-Underwood, Scientist, Fayette Academy, Headmaster Ron Canada, Memphis Astronomical Society, West Tennessee STEM Hub, Dr. Alfred Hall, II, Director, Eads Animal Hospital, Dr. Tim Montague, Veterinarian, and Mr. Tommy Conn, retired Memphis City Schools’ Science Supervisor. No school in Tennessee has participated in the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program before this year. We are joined on Mission 6 by Knox County, TN. This is not only a first for Fayette Academy, it is a first for any student in Tennessee. “

Melissa Norwood, project Co-Director said, “This SSEP project has been an incredible experience.  I have seen students who struggle with the content we go over in class, come to me with in depth explanations for their projects, because they have done the background research and they KNOW the material.  It has been amazing also to watch formerly timid students gain confidence from their research and interaction with adults, and start to lead their project group effectively.  This program has made a very real difference in our students, and I can see that many of them will go on to STEM careers, because of their involvement with this project.”

“Science walks on the shoulders of the giants that came before us,” an encouraging quote by Tommy Conn, is on the walls of the Fayette Academy Biology lab. “This quote from my father has always reminded me of the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) that provides every student an opportunity to conduct real-world scientific research. Fayette Academy networked with Racquel Collins-Underwood, PhD, a scientist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, over six weeks.  Dr. Collins-Underwood served as a research consultant for teams at Fayette Academy.  All students were encouraged to reach out to scientists in their teams’ field of study,” Donna Burrus, project Co-Director, explained. “SSEP is providing the students of Fayette Academy and Tennessee an exciting opportunity to join in an experience they will remember for a lifetime.  Students have experienced interactions with STEM professionals and begin their journey towards jobs of the 21st century.”

Terri Reeves, Computer Teacher and SSEP Co-Director said, “As I watched my students incorporate the technology skills they were learning this year into the SSEP project on “Make it Work” Mondays in the computer lab, I was excited to see many spend break time and work as they ate lunch in the classroom striving to improve their research. Combining Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics this year allowed the students to experience real world opportunities of tomorrow. At the conclusion of the year I surveyed my students about bringing more technology into our computer lab classes. Over 85% expressed an interest in computer programming, and because of this excitement, we will add programming to our curriculum in the fall. The opportunities to collaboratively research,  work, design, and create important science experiments that will fly to the ISS has definitely sparked an interest in our students that will hopefully continue to inspire them throughout the rest of their lives. These technology skills and opportunities will prepare our students for the cutting edge technology careers of tomorrow.”

The Student Spaceflight Experiments Programs (SSEP) is undertaken by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education internationally. SSEP is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory. NCESSE, the Clarke Institute, and NanoRacks are therefore designated SSEP Strategic Partners. To read about the programmatic roles and responsibilities of the SSEP Strategic Partners, visit the SSEP Team page SSEP.ncesse.org.

Three Local Student Teams Selected as Finalists in Competition to Fly a Microgravity Experiment to the International Space Station

Pictured above: Left to Right, back row: Logan Enriquez, Adam Jamerson, Jacob Bennett, Mark Montague, Tucker Whittington, Dunston Ashe,  Dylan Andrews  front row: Anna Laura Curry,  Courtney Gilgen. Averi Davis, Harley Wade, Matthew Walker, Stone Hunt, Haven McLemore

Three Fayette Academy student scientist research teams were selected to move on to the National Review Panel for selection. The winning Student Spaceflight Experiments Research Project will represent Fayette County and will be  ferried to the International Space Station in the fall of 2014.

Cancer Cells Develop in Microgravity by Co-Principal Investigators Jacob Bennett, 12th grade, Anna Laura Currey, 10th grade and Courtney Gilgen, 12th grade with Co-Investigators Logan Enriquez, 10th grade, and Adam Jamerson, 10th grade

Diffusion in Space by 6th grade Co-Principal Investigators Dunstan Ashe, Stone Hunt, Haven McLemore, Matthew Walker and Co-Investigator Dylan Andrews

Reishi Mushroom VS. E. coli and ChronicMyeloid Leukemia by Principal Investigator Mark Montague, 9th grade and Co-Investigators Averi Davis, 10th grade, Harley Wade, 9th grade, and Tucker Whittington, 9th grade

STEM IN SPACE

The Student Spaceflight Experiments Programs (SSEP) is undertaken by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education internationally. SSEP is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working inpartnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory. NCESSE, the Clarke Institute, and NanoRacks are therefore designated SSEP Strategic Partners. To read about the programmatic roles and responsibilities of the SSEP Strategic Partners, visit the SSEP Team page (http://ssep.ncesse.org).

Pictured below are the members of Fayette Academy’s Level One Review Panel.  These science and education professionals reviewed over thirty team projects from fifth through twelfth grades. Their goal was to select the top three projects that will move to the National Review Panel at the National Smithsonian Air and Space Museum.   The research project selected will represent Fayette County on their exciting opportunity that will include sending an experimental microgravity mini-lab to the International Space Station.  This summer in July the winning project will be highlighted at the SSEP National Conference where students will make a PowerPoint presentation and greet the public touring the country’s most popular Smithsonian Museum each day.  Students will use the aid of a display board to explain their research questions and hypothesis.

Student Spaceflight Experiments Project Review Panel members Left to Right, Local Veterinarian Dr. Tim Montague, Retired Science Supervisor Tommy Conn, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientist Raquel Collins-Underwood, PhD, Hari Hara SK Potula, PhD, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital Scientist Olena M Filchakova, PhD and Dr. Alan Hall, University of Memphis Education professor and director of the West Tennessee STEM Hub.

STUDENT SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIMENTS PROGRAM WINNERS

Fayette Academy Grade Level Winners, SSEP projects
5th grade: Decomposer in Space, designed by Dylan Crawford, Josh Creech, Hayden Weber, and Ben Morris
6th grade: Diffusion, designed by Dylan Andrews, Dunston Ashe, Stone Hunt, Haven
McLemore and Matthew Walker
7th grade: Protein Crystals, designed by Linnea Lyons, Trey Powers, Connor Pattat, Sophie Umbarger
8th grade: Bacterial Membrane Destroyer, designed by Vivian Fergie, Mattie Pierski, Luke Reeves, and Kendall Walker
9th grade: Reishi Mushrooms vs. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, designed by Averi Davis, Mark Montague, Harley Wade, and Tucker Whittington
10th/12th grade: Rate of Cancer Cells Development, designed by Jacob Bennett, Anna Laura Currey, Logan Enriquez, Courtney Gilgen, and Adam Jamerson
11th grade: MuL V in Microgravity, designed by Brixton Bishop, Rebecca Fletcher, and Molly McDonald

FAYETTE ACADEMY STUDENTS SPEND LUNCH DEVELOPING ISS PROJECT

Left to right, Jimmie Becker, Tyler Irby, Phillip Morgan, Jamie Shotwell

STEM IN SPACE: The Student Spaceflight Experiments Programs (SSEP) is undertaken by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education internationally. SSEP is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory. NCESSE, the Clarke Institute, and NanoRacks are therefore designated SSEP Strategic Partners. To read about the programmatic roles and responsibilities of the SSEP Strategic Partners, visit the SSEP Team page (SSEP.ncesse.org).

STUDENT SPACE STEM PROJECT DESIGN

STUDENTS PREPARE RESEARCH PROJECTS FOR JUDGING

 STUDENT STEM RESEARCH

Fayette Academy students in grades 5-12 conduct background research, develop research questions and hypothesis. This week students were selecting to spend time during their lunch period as well as before and after school, to work on their STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) Experiment that may be selected to go to the International Space Station representing Fayette County and Fayette Academy. This is the first year any Tennessee school has been selected to participate in this exciting Student Spaceflight Experiments Program.

Above students don’t let the lack of chairs due to a club lunch meeting keep them from working on their project ideas. Research ideas include plant respiration rates, antibiotic effectiveness, cancer cell growth rates, embryonic development of fish, chromatography, mold growth, and a leukemia treatment study.

STEM IN SPACE: The Student Spaceflight Experiments Programs (SSEP) is undertaken by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education internationally. SSEP is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory. NCESSE, the Clarke Institute, and NanoRacks are therefore designated SSEP Strategic Partners. To read about the programmatic roles and responsibilities of the SSEP Strategic Partners, visit the SSEP Team page (SSEP.ncesse.org).

COMMUNITY SKY WATCH

Everyone is invited to attend the Community Sky Watch on April 22, 2014.

STUDENT EXPERIMENT TO FLY ON ISS

Fayette Academy has some out of this world news: The school has been selected to participate in the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program for Mission 6 to the International Space Station. This IS a big deal, one that excites the fifth through twelfth grade students. Summer Rudd, a twelfth grade student, believes that “being a part of SSEP creates the opportunity to reach outside our rural agricultural community and to explore new horizons of space that modern science, technology, engineering and mathematics provide.” Jeanna Jeffries, a seventh grader, calls the opportunity one of those “once in a lifetime things,” while fifth grader Emma Walker is ready “to think outside the box and be creative.”

What actually will the 336 students be doing and what will end up flying into space? Under the direction of Donna Burrus, biology lab instructor, student teams will design research proposals for microgravity experiments. This involves first much brainstorming and then developing questions about microgravity, the condition when people or objects appear to be weightless. For eight weeks the student teams will work extensively on their proposals, following a rigorous set of guidelines. After that, three proposals will be selected by a local panel of judges. Those three will then be judged by a national selection committee, which will choose the one microgravity experiment for astronauts to conduct onboard the International Space Station next Fall.  In the words of fifth grader Ragen Morris, “This designing a project sounds off the hook!”

Fifth grade students L-R:  Sydney Hall, Hadley Middlecoff, Ashton Fitzsimmons, and Madison Doyle

As stated earlier, this is a big deal – one that not only involves hard work from the students but participation from many people at the local and state level. Moreover, the contribution of $8,500 from the Tennessee Grant Consortium was essential to getting this project off the ground. A total of $21, 500 will be needed to fully fund the antigravity chamber and payload. Contributions are welcomed. Contact Donna Burrus atdlburrus@fayetteacademy.com for more information.

The SSEP is spearheaded by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, a nonprofit organization that inspires the next generation of scientists and engineers by engaging their natural human desire to be curious and explore. Fayette Academy looks forward to many future discoveries.

The SSEP (http://ssep.ncesse.org) is undertaken by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in partnership with NanoRacks, LLC. This on-orbit educational research opportunity is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory.

SSEP PATCH DESIGN COMPETITION


STUDENT EXPERIMENT TO FLY ON INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

Fayette Academy has some out of this world news: The school has been selected to participate in the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program for Mission 6 to the International Space Station. This IS a big deal, one that excites the fifth through twelfth grade students. Summer Rudd, a twelfth grade student, believes that “being a part of SSEP creates the opportunity to reach outside our rural agricultural community and to explore new horizons of space that modern science, technology, engineering and mathematics provide.” Jeanna Jeffries, a seventh grader, calls the opportunity one of those “once in a lifetime things,” while fifth grader Emma Walker is ready “to think outside the box and be creative.”

What actually will the 336 students be doing and what will end up flying into space? Under the direction of Donna Burrus, biology lab instructor, student teams will design research proposals for microgravity experiments. This involves first much brainstorming and then developing questions about microgravity, the condition when people or objects appear to be weightless. For eight weeks the student teams will work extensively on their proposals, following a rigorous set of guidelines. After that, three proposals will be selected by a local panel of judges. Those three will then be judged by a national selection committee, which will choose the one microgravity experiment for astronauts to conduct onboard the International Space Station next Fall.  In the words of fifth grader Ragen Morris, “This designing a project sounds off the hook!”

As stated earlier, this is a big deal – one that not only involves hard work from the students but participation from many people at the local and state level. Moreover, the contribution of $8,500 from the Tennessee Grant Consortium was essential to getting this project off the ground. A total of $21, 500 will be needed to fully fund the antigravity chamber and payload. Contributions are welcomed. Contact Donna Burrus atdlburrus@fayetteacademy.com for more information.

The SSEP is spearheaded by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, a nonprofit organization that inspires the next generation of scientists and engineers by engaging their natural human desire to be curious and explore. Fayette Academy looks forward to many future discoveries.

The SSEP (http://ssep.ncesse.org) is undertaken by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) in partnership with NanoRacks, LLC. This on-orbit educational research opportunity is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory.